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Do you get enough sleep?
Photo by Sarah Comeau

Do you get enough sleep?

Many highly sensitive people struggle with sleep issues. Perhaps it’s because we have trouble turning off our racing minds or decompressing after a stressful day.

Proper sleep is an important part of self-care. Sleep guards us against heart disease, increased risk of illness, poor work performance, mood problems like depression, anger and irritability, and risk of unhealthy weight gain and loss.

How much sleep should you get? There is no magic number. Individual needs vary, and age also plays a role. Use the recommendations below from The National Sleep Foundation as a guideline. (more…)

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Do you blush?

Do you blush? I do! Very easily I may add. Any number of emotions and physical reactions can set it off. It’s embarrassing sometimes, but I’ve learned to live with it. It’s a learned response.

My blushing can come at a moment’s notice. I can’t prepare for it, it’s a natural reaction for me. Here are some ways my blushing manifests itself:

  • When I feel overwhelmed. Feeling overwhelmed is a natural occurrence when you go above your emotional and physical limits. I use blushing as my natural barometer to take a break and rest. (more…)

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How can you improve your memory at any age?

As highly sensitive people, we love to learn and think deeply, so improving memory and maintaining our brain power for as long as possible should always be a priority! I recently read an article by Drs. Oz and Roisen on improving memory at any age. Below are their thoughts:

Brain scientists love to say the brain is “plastic,” which means it’s flexible and capable of growing new cells and making strong new connections between them, at any age. That means brain-friendly lifestyle changes can help ward off memory problems. Here are some lifestyle upgrades:

  • Enjoy plenty of produce, lean protein, good fats, 100 percent whole grains, and a little fat-free dairy, while steering clear of added sugars, syrups, trans and saturated fats and any grain that’s not 100 percent whole. (more…)

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Do you have Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)?
Photo by Anthony Tran

Do you have Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)?

Each winter, 500,000 people in the United States are said to become depressed and suffer from seasonal affective disorder or SAD, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians. The cause of this disorder is the decrease in the amount of available daytime light, an amount that drops from the long days of summer months.

It’s not the lack of light that causes a drop in mood specifically, it’s how that drop in light causes reactions in the body. Research from the Mayo Clinic suggests that lack of light can do one of three things in the body to cause depression. (more…)

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