Would you like to be more interesting?

Would you like to be more interesting? An easy way to do this is to have a hobby. Highly sensitive people have a natural way of being creative and having a vast amount of interests. Do you utilize this talent for your personal happiness and being able to share your passions with others?

If not, you’re missing a perfect opportunity to be attractive to the types of people who are “good” for you. By that I mean, your hobbies/ interests, are the vehicle that can help you socialize with others that you have things in common with. Your hobby can be a catalyst to starting your own business or maybe give you ideas to pursue a certain endeavor that you may have not thought about.

I get many questions from highly sensitive people about how they can meet others like themselves. Right livelihood is another common concern. Your talents and passions hold the key to unlock the answers to these questions.

If you feel that you don’t have ideas about a hobby, here is an idea to get you started. Collecting is a fun way to spend your time and share what you have with others. People collect a vast array of items that you may not have thought about. They are as follows: (more…)

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Does honesty really improve health?

Does honesty really improve health? Benjamin Franklin once quipped that “honesty was the best policy.” It certainly builds better personal and business relationships. In and of themselves, those are great benefits. But are there more?

Yes! Honesty also improves health. Even researchers now are studying the effects, including Anita E. Kelly, a psychology professor at the University of Notre Dame. Kelly conducted a study called “The Science of Honesty” to determine how living an honest life impacts health. (more…)

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Cliff Harwin’s Interview With Grace Kerina

Here’s an interview that I had done with Grace Kerina in 2009:

I would imagine that working in the pest control industry would be difficult for a highly sensitive person for a variety of reasons, such as being around pesticides and killing insects and rodents. Is it? If so, how do you manage?

I’ve been in the pest control industry for over thirty years. I first became involved with the industry when I started working in my father’s business. I eventually started my own company and have been self-employed for twenty-nine years. I didn’t have a great desire to start my own business, but I realized that it was the best way for me to “survive” and sustain myself. I didn’t know that I was a HSP at the time, but my instincts told me I needed to be in a situation where I could control my work environment at my own pace. I would strongly suggest to your readers that they might be happier and more productive in their own business or in a position where they have a lot of independence.

My pest control work involves taking care of insect and rodent problems in homes and businesses. I truly feel that I’m in a helping profession. We HSPs are very helpful people! I help people by protecting them from the diseases that some insects and rodents can cause and also by protecting their properties from damage. The first thing I do is make recommendations for preventing pest problems, such as making repairs or checking for infested food products. I don’t indiscriminately use pesticides or rodenticides. I’m certified by the State of New Jersey and only use products that are approved by The Environmental Protection Agency. I see myself as an environmentalist. (more…)

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Would you like to be self-employed?

Would you like to be self-employed? I made a conscious decision at a young age to have my own business. I didn’t necessarily have a burning desire to do this, but I decided it was the best way to support myself. Being the non-conformist that I am, I found it more stressful to work for someone else than to be self-employed.

Here are some advantages of self-employment:

* You set your own schedule and choose your own hours. As a highly sensitive person, I needed to have the flexibility to work at my own pace.

* You don’t have to ask permission to do anything. I never liked to ask permission for anything. This includes seeking permission from my parents and teachers. (more…)

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